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Drama in a Time of Election

Hey Bazzers - so as there’s nothing possibly happening in the world, the terrifying motions of which starting in the USA of November last year, peaking this January, continuing on like some hellish monster sliming over the hill, causing a deep shadow with its toupee wherever it goes - nothing’s really going on. Oh yeah, there’s a little something that happened allots night and this morning (steady now, not that) which may mean more of the same or a chance to make things better, brighter and more fair - but you know. We’re actually at a loss on something to write on this week, soo, you know….

We can’t hold it in anymore.

Come onn That was a stunning turnout. Young people, hold still. We're about to hug you all, we don't care how long it takes - us at Baz HQ are very proud. Also with a bloke that was on the scene. Rhymes with Fereby Jorbine. Did a Fantastic Job. What a leading man! 

But in the meantime the fight goes on -and  the key word is normalisation. We’re used to things being rubbish - we could, we know it’s insane,  get used to not having an NHS, higher taxes, it’s possible - as long as it becomes normal. Here at Baz we are certainly not in favour of these punishments dressed up as ‘measures’ and ‘policies’ - we are in favour of fair play and decency, a moral duty to be fair and to help all. We also want to make theatre that challenges audiences and reflects society. We aren’t the first to do this, and we won’t be the last as the arts community has always impressively shown out on the side of good time after time, and in a unique way: by seemingly indulging in the dark : George Orwell’s seminal Nineteen Eighty Four for example has entered our lexicon of language, and has, we suspect scared many a stateswoman or man away from making too much of a draconian policy stick. Though of course some have had a good go. For our ‘protection’ - ahh we see now! It all makes sense.

You really can write this stuff. It’s so predictable.

As we’ve mentioned before, the arts is a great tool of fighting back and protesting, In the 1850s Verdi sparked national revolution in Italy with his opera La Battaglia di Legnano, that famous close up painting of Honecker and Brezhnev French kissing on the Berlin wall, and the late Rik Mayall almost single handedly popping the balloon of privilege and power the Thatcherites claimed in the late eightes. Billy Bragg continues to write songs that lambast right wing media and racist indoctrinated opinions with his witty and often moving songs. All art holds society to account in different ways. As we try to do in our performances, as stated in our manifesto, we want to challenge and educate audiences. Sometimes you need to force a terrible, not so far future on audiences, readers and gallery visitors to make an impact. And along with our sunglasses, gum, notebook and pen and our dog-eared copy of Kafka we’ve told people we’ve *totally read* here are some Baz Picks to get educated without being lectured to: with clever devices, fully fleshed out characters and intricate plots; with theatre.

  • Nineteen Eighty Four: A fantastic Novel by George Orwell that basically invented the sci-fi political horror and has remained influential: currently actors, voices of interest and celebrities are reading it non-stop at UCL library for its anniversary, watch it again here : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrSkAvzjhkI&feature=youtu.be

  • The Handmaid’s Tale: By Margaret Atwood, in 1985 -  the era of Reagan, it was tough being a woman, with reproductive rights systematically stripped away and many basic human rights being denied women. A classic of the genre, it’s currently being revived as a TV series on Channel 4: with a mainly all female writing and acting cast led by the brilliant Elisabeth Moss

  • The Hothouse: By Harold Pinter, this not so often performed classic is brutal in its vagueness of how the world has changed, trapped inside a prison system where you’re not sure who’s prisoner and keeper. Deeply psychological and fairly disturbing this had a recent revival at Trafalgar Studios with John Simm - worth catching onstage as the text is so open to interpretation.

  • Party Time: again by Harold Pinter, this almost forgotten TV playscript was a late Play for Today in Pinter’s repertoire - and again showcases the playwright’s talent for drip feeding information, and hinting at a brutal world outside the finery or the room where the dystopian elite clink glasses while a faceless army which once protected them advances slowly. A tour de force of slow burn dystopian horror.

  • Far Away by Caryl Churchill: unlike Pinter, we have an all-too real description of the world outside - where everyone and everything has turned on each other: Salt fights Pepper, land fights sea. Another one not to be missed and regularly enjoys great revivals.

  • Cleansed, by Sarah Kane follows in the steps of only four plays we have of hers: brutally and disturbingly. Cleansed is no different - where the hospital and the University become settings for torture and awful experimentation with shocking results. There’s no dystopia here, only the end destination if we carry on down the road of thinking in a particularly damaging way of others - a small minded and abhorrent point of view we are all unfortunately familiar with now.

  • Chimerica, a modern play by Lucy Kirkwood tackled a modern paradigm and how countries become companies, how besting others is the only recourse, no matter the human cost - as well as the price incredible human sacrifice. A modern classic.
  • The Observer, by Matt Charman, a deeply principled play which asks are we in the west really the best arbiters of all things ‘good’ - democracy, human rights, equality - set against the backdrop of a small election in an African country in danger of a rigged and unfair election. An excellent piece of political theatre that defies the label and instead goes to the root of the problem: us, and the opinions and beliefs we hold dear, but hide.

Read these plays and Corbyn’s manifesto. Take part.

It's quite a good bedside read, actually.

Pretty Please!

With love and hope, here's Billy Bragg with some salient advice, though five years old, very relevant to an Australian Octogenarian who thought he and his media empire had it in the bag. It's mad catchy too. 

 

Love,

Baz x

 

 

 

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Baz Productions here, signing off on 2016 –

Us too, kitty. Us too.

Us too, kitty. Us too.

As you may have heard, (or rather seen – you can’t hear an email…yet, remember that thought, 2016) we explained just what Baz had achieved this year in our most recent newsletter: from rehearsals to shows, workshops to Teach First sessions, 2016 felt like a really bumper year for the Baz Team. But really, we couldn’t have done it without you – our loyal Bazzers so glasses of sherry/cava/whiskey/Schloer up to you all, and let’s all toast with shortbread and compare flavours (if you don’t like the ones with strawberry in, we can’t talk)

So as a final post for the year, we’ll end as we mean to go on, with a spotlight – remember those? – posts we’ve gladly given over to the memory and inspiration brought about from our personal favourites – from Amy Winehouse to Ziggy Stardust, we tried to give an insight into our internal mood board: what wide range of disciplines inspired us, from dance, to photography,to music and to outstanding individuals. So what better way to wrap up the year, than for the company that brought you dreamplay, described by some as: ‘beautiful and bonkers, ‘free’ and ‘forcefully proficient’ (incidently, a pretty on the nose description of us after a few glasses of red) we thought we’d treat you to an Alternative Baz Christmas, full of tips, tricks and reccomendations worthy of the closing of a year that has us immersing ourselves in our own subconscious, Strindberg’s , Freud’s – the cast’s and those of the characters we made up. Pray for us.

Soundtrack:

The holiday season brings with it many things – the chance to catch up with family, get cosy by the fire with a loved one, all with good food and wine to keep you in that dozy, well-fed stupor of happiness….riiiight up to the point Noddy Holder shouts “IT’S CHRISTMAAAAAASS” directly into your lughole ruining your cosy eqilibrium/carving the turkey/or a meeting under the mistletoe. We’re sorry to demonise him like this, but honestly, we’d give anything to keep that roar from our door, so here’s a selection of alternative Christmas tracks:

Bobby Darin; basically anything by him. Even if it’s not Christmassy – hell if anyone canmake murder sound merry it’s him in ‘Mack The Knife’ – let his warm and full bodied voice accompany your post Christmas lunch sit down.

Nina Simone: Her entire discography is a feast of good music, passion, and sheer force of her will – a brilliant and important musician – and her debut album ‘Little Girl Blue’ is an absolute must. Though there is no mention of Christmas or the holiday season at all – this collection that includes the classic ‘My Baby Just Cares For Me’ ,the title track ending on an unexpected riff on a holiday Carol and it’s autumnal cover of a wrapped up Simone sitting on a park bench in frosty Central Park, another treat for your ears.

Funny Songs: Ben Folds is a serious musician guys….he really is – and it is proved by his foray into the festive Christmas spirit and his very NSFW offering of‘Bizarre Christmas Incident’ (we did warn you…it pops up on BBC 6 music a LOT, surprisingly) as well as this gem from one of our favourite comedies, Community where Childish Gambino himself raps about a Jehovah’s witness Christmas. 

Plaintive Christmas: If there’s no breaking your sour mood as we transition from the, frankly pile of poo 2016 was into the suspiciously-smelling-of-manure 2017, wallow with style as Chilly Gonzales (another of our faves and musical genius) provides ‘A Minor Christmas Medley’ where the simple act of transposing a key down to minor makes a startling difference to your favourite sing a long classics, making them oddly beautiful and haunting.  And finally, if you just want calm and serenity after aching muscles carrying shopping down he assault course of the high street, let George Winston’s instrumental album ‘December’ ease your shoulders back down from your ears.

Suitably relaxed, you’ll now want some entertainment and Baz has some thoughts there too…

Doctor Who: I know, I know, disappointingly mainstream but also a massive figure-puller, with regular numbers hitting the high millions, it’s become something of a national tradition. And hey, it’s not every mainstream show that has offered robot santas, time travel and deadly wi-fi is it? Cut us some slack.

Chicken Run: Controversial, we know, to choose the hen coop over Wensleydale and evil penguins, but there’s jut something about it coming on that heralds Christmas. We, however, never get misty eyed when the chickens manage to escape the farm. No, never.

A Fish Called Wanda: An odd choice of Christmas film, we admit, with no mention of Christmas, or of winter even, but if you’re year isn’t instantly saved by Kevin Kline narrowing his eyes and drawling “Oh, you English think you’re soooo superior, don’t you?” Well, we just don’t know you.

The Reith Lectures: The radio gets much maligned at Chistmastime, (especially as here is where Noddy is to be found…) but there’s a wealth of exellent programming, and music from BBC Radio 6 music, arts on BBC Radio three, the list is endless...not to mention the annual Reith lectures, managing every year to get some piece of interesting information past our whiskey and eggnog addled brains. Especially if it's like this, the year when they moved the lecture to the telly: 

Food:

What we’re all here for really isn’t it? The three Cs truly come out to play, Carbs, Chocolate and Carrots – or at least it does when you have a vegetarian Christmas. Oh yes. It can be done. You could cheat and get Quorn equivalents or you could do wintry vegetable salads, lasagna, melanzane parmigiana, flaky pastry olive and mushroom pie, rostie potatoes – the possibilities are endless and at this time of year, a change to give back a little without losing the quality or quantity is a tempting thought. More temptig than another slice of gateau though? We're just not sure. 

Whatever you decide to do over the holidays, be safe, be merry, be free and bonkers like us, and you won’t go far wrong. Happy Holidays you lovely Bazzers – wishing you health and happiness *heart eyes* and here's to 2017 - we've got a good feeling about this. 

 

yep.   

yep.

 

Love,

Baz xx

 

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